Scotland finds modifying school environments ‘effective’ in stopping violence against girls

The new report published by the Scottish Government assessed evidence of effectiveness of various international schemes within schools and other education settings that aimed to prevent violence against women and girls (VAWG), but warns that more research is needed.

There is ‘strong evidence’ that intervention schemes that make systematic changes to areas or environments that students felt were unsafe were effective in preventing VAWG, a new study by the Scottish government has found.

US intervention schemes, such as the Shifting Boundaries campaign, aim to prevent violence against women and girls through combining classroom learning with real-world alterations to the environments within the school setting.

Within traditional curriculum-based learning, students were encouraged to mark out areas on maps where in the school they felt safe and unsafe. These maps were then used to drive school-level interventions, such as increased staff supervision, revising school protocols temporary exclusion zones and post campaigns.

The report found that these forms of intervention schemes saw ‘reductions of perpetration’ and were more effective in reducing sexual harassment and violence than classroom education alone.

However, there were warnings that further research was needed over the viability of using international intervention methods within domestic prevention policies, as there was ‘limited evidence’ of what was successful across multiple populations.

Prevention methods that promote bystander intervention, such as Scotland’s own Mentors in Violence Prevention, as well as those that promote equality within relationships, showed ‘promising’ levels of success, but often resulted in ‘attitudinal change rather than the reduction of violence as an explicit outcome’.

The study found that wider interventions campaigns that aim to prevent domestic abuse, honour-based violence and Female Genital Mutilation required more research to assess their effectiveness.

Break

Senior Support Worker (Children & Young People)

Job of the week

Featured jobs

Break

Senior Support Worker (Children & Young People)

Rethink Mental Illness

Mental Health Care Navigator

Turning Tides

Homelessness Social Worker

Age UK

Social Prescribing Link Worker

Most popular articles today

“There was nothing for social work”: Social work sector responds to the Budget

“There was nothing for social work”: Social work sector responds to the Budget

Life sentences for people smugglers won't work, refugee action group warns

Life sentences for people smugglers won't work, refugee action group warns

Review of Children’s Social Care in England formally launches and publishes early plans

Review of Children’s Social Care in England formally launches and publishes early plans

New research reveals link between maternal mental health and children born into care

New research reveals link between maternal mental health and children born into care

SWT_SideAd1.png
Box ad final 3.jpg

What's new today:

“There was nothing for social work”: Social work sector responds to the Budget

About Us

Social Work Today is an online platform, developed to give professionals a sector-specific space that creates the networks to provide them with social work information, webinars, jobs and CPD from across the UK and wider global community.

Advertise with us

There are a number of options to promote your organisation on Social Work Today, from banner and advertising spaces, to job postings that are uniquely personalised to effectively showcase your message.

Click here to find out more

  • Instagram
© Social Work Today 2021